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Posted by on Nov 02, 2013 .

Silk Chassis specialises in handwoven textiles of natural fibres. Why? In cultures and countries where it is easy to pop into a shop and buy a synthetic scarf, with a printed pattern, made in China, India or Lithuania, for under £15, it’s a fair question.

Oddly perhaps, it’s not easy or quick to answer satisfactorily. Here I should...

Let’s be honest, the Glow Wild series probably isn’t for the shy and retiring. But for the exuberant, these vivid colourways are sure to set your summer ablaze.

 

Glow Wild is a limited edition series in our bestselling Saraswati Silks range. Each of these pure silk scarves, handwoven in northern India, combines two shimmering...

Posted by on Aug 20, 2014 .

Fashionistas often talk of ‘wardrobe staples’. But who covets such dull and worthy garments?

Even if you do have a slew of sensible staples, or perhaps are just bored by your clothes, worry not. No need for a wardrobe makeover – Silk Chassis has the perfect, painless solution – a two-tone silk scarf from our Saraswati range.

We...

Posted by on Aug 21, 2014 .

Silk is the natural product of the silkworm – it’s the fibre the caterpillar secretes to protect itself in a cocoon, like all moths and butterflies before they emerge from the chrysalis stage. But that’s enough reminder of school biology!

The important thing here is the length and smoothness of silk fibres. These create the incredible...

The reversible two-tone effect of our Saraswati scarves is characteristic of a particular weave known as Reversible Spanish satin weave.

This weaving technique has been known in the sacred Indian city of Varanasi since at least the 19th century. The weft and warp (the horizontal and vertical threads in a scarf) are different colours. But it...

It’s no surprise that Mr Khan, a Varanasi resident, reinvented reversible Spanish Satin weave for the 21st century. The sacred city by the Ganges has a rich weaving heritage, dating back centuries, including luxurious silk brocade. Traditionally, Indian brides had their wedding saris woven here.

Pilgrims flock to Varanasi - it’s the...

Like all Silk Chassis scarves, Saraswati silks are woven by hand. When I first discovered them, I was surprised and impressed by their quality: the fine, regular weave, neat selvedge (the edges) - not to mention the striking reversible colourways.

When you consider these are woven entirely by hand on decades-old looms, it brings new (or...

Silk absorbs colour very well, whether natural or chemical dyes. Originally, colours ground from plants, bark and even insects, were used. Perhaps the most well known is indigo, a blue colour obtained from several plants in Asia and Europe (where it was called woad). While natural dyes are enjoying a revival, most fabrics today are dyed with...